Archive for Sequestration

Greenwash, Ecobuild, Disclosure

Letting the train take the strainBit of a mixed bag this, and perhaps the title of this post is a little too sweeping, but then we’re feeling a little incensed by a recent article in the Independent. In a spectacularly poorly researched piece of dross, Simon Usborne and Helen Brown attempt to “face the facts many ecologists would rather ignore”.

There’s a grain of truth in some of them, such as the notion that food miles aren’t a bombproof proxy for the carbon footprint of a product. Indeed, we’ve touched on the same subject. Similarly, it’s true to say that an ancient woodland isn’t sequestering carbon at the same rate as a fast growing, young plantation of, say, eucalyptus trees. Read the rest of this entry »

Africa sinks up

Tree measurements show that African rainforests are locking up carbon faster than ever

Tree measurements show that African rainforests are locking up carbon faster than ever

While much of the alarm over global deforestation centres on the Amazon rainforest, which continues at a shocking rate, African rainforests receive relatively little attention. Yet a study published today in Nature demonstrates the increasing size of the carbon sink these forests contain: similar to Amazonian forests in per unit area terms.

A large international team of scientists, headed up by Simon Lewis at the University of Leeds, found that across 79 plots in ten African countries, the above-ground carbon storage increased by 0.63 Mg C per hectare per year, between 1968 and 2007. Scaling up to include unmeasured material — roots, small trees, rotting trees and so on — brings the continental increase in carbon storage to 0.34 Pg C (that’s 340 million tonnes of carbon) per year. Read the rest of this entry »

A good place to bury bad news

Lovelock proposes the world's biggest barbecue

Lovelock proposes the world's biggest barbecue. Photo (c) Peter Guess

Carbon sequestration — taking CO2 out of the atmosphere, as opposed to merely not adding to it — is the thing that will fix the mess we’ve created. Avoiding emissions is all well and good, and will ensure that things get back to how they should be, eventually. But wouldn’t it be a good idea to help things along a little?

There have been lots of suggestions about how we might be able to draw CO2 back out of the sky. Solutions range from the mechanical (e.g. the fabled carbon capture and storage beloved of coal-firing power companies), through the chemical (like iron enrichment of the oceans to promote blooming of carbon-storing algae) to the biological (such as our favourite, planting trees). Read the rest of this entry »